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Experiencing Trigger Finger?


Trigger finger occurs when inflammation narrows the space within the sheath that surrounds the tendon in the affected finger.

If trigger finger is severe, your finger may become locked in a bent position.


People whose work or hobbies require repetitive gripping actions are at higher risk of developing trigger finger. The condition is also more common in women and in anyone with diabetes.




Symptoms:

- Finger stiffness, particularly in the morning

- A popping or clicking sensation as you move your finger

- Tenderness or a bump in the palm at the base of the affected finger

- Finger catching or locking in a bent position, which suddenly pops straight

- Finger locked in a bent position, which you are unable to straighten


Causes:

Trigger finger occurs when the affected finger's tendon sheath becomes irritated and inflamed. This interferes with the normal gliding motion of the tendon through the sheath.


Treatment of trigger finger varies depending on the severity. Treatments such as:

  • Medication; An anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen or naproxen may relieve the pain but are unlikely to relieve the swelling constricting the tendon sheath or trapping the tendon.

  • Physiotherapy; Stretching exercises help to maintain mobility in your finger. Avoid activities that require repetitive gripping or prolonged use of vibrating hand-held machinery until your symptoms improve

  • Injection; Steroid injection to reduce inflammation and allow the tendon to glide freely again (For people with diabetes, steroid injections tend to be less effective)

  • Surgery; Working through a small incision near the base of your affected finger, a surgeon can cut open the constricted section of tendon sheath. This procedure is usually done in an operating room.

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